I feel like bustin’ loose, bustin’ loose!

As our final weekend before splash approached we compared our to-do list with the available hours in a weekend, and braced ourselves for a Very.  Long.  Weekend.  Fortunately we got off to a flying start when we received a call from John Bayreuther on Thursday letting us know that the rudder stuffing box was finished!

John told Jeff that it took a 10 ton hydraulic puller to break it free (apparently it made quite the loud pop when it came loose) but all was well now.  After hearing that, we felt a lot better about not being able to free it ourselves.  It’s funny – our boat neighbors at Shenny asked us that weekend if we were all set, and when they heard what Bayreuther had to do to free the box every single one of them commented on how we must not have felt inadequate after that.  I guess we’ve all been there at some point!

As we drove down bright and early on Saturday, we were excited to see how the rudder post and new hose looked.  What a difference:

Continue reading “I feel like bustin’ loose, bustin’ loose!”

That sucker is stuck.

After taking care of our propeller shaft stuffing box last fall, it was time to turn our attention to the rudder shaft stuffing box.  Jeff had noticed during last season that the hose surrounding the stuffing box was very old with many signs of serious cracks.  Given that a rupture of the hose would result in a significant amount of ocean water coming into the boat, we knew we needed to take care of it this offseason.

Unable to find anything online about servicing the rudder shaft stuffing box, we were essentially going to have to go in blind for this project.  Not surprisingly with a 40 year old boat, its been a challenge, and unfortunately we’re not finished yet.

Continue reading “That sucker is stuck.”

Now we know why it’s called a stuffing box.

Since buying Little Bristol four years ago, we’ve heard boaters refer to a mysterious “stuffing box.”  Tom, who we bought Little Bristol from, told us when we were first looking at her that he had recently done the stuffing box, making a face that indicated it was a real pain so we should be glad that he had taken care of it.  We nodded sympathetically like we knew what he was talking about, all the while thinking “Stuffing box??” to ourselves.

When we bought Pegu Club we didn’t know when the stuffing box had last been taken care of, and frankly, we still didn’t know what it was.  We just knew that water dripped from it when the propeller shaft turned.  Apparently you want it to drip, but not too much.  This season there was plenty of evidence that it was dripping, so we tucked it away in the back of our minds as a possible off-season project.  Then Jeff noticed that the hose that clamps around the stern tube and keeps the ocean out of our boat had definitely seen better days, judging by the number of cracks in it.  Now replacing the hose was definitely on the to-do list for this off-season.  Since we needed to remove the stuffing box in order to access the hose, we figured we might as well take care of both of the stuffing boxes while we were at it.

Our various books told us that there is a stuffing box for the propeller shaft and another one for the rudder stock.  The stuffing box is a threaded sleeve and a hollow nut through which the propeller shaft (and rudder stock) passes through.  The sleeve (or sometimes the nut) is filled with a material that forms a watertight seal but still allows the propeller shaft to turn.  Water is required to lubricate the material, so the stuffing box needs to drip when the shaft it turning (unless you have a dripless system).  Great.  Now that we knew what it was (and what it looked like), it was time to have at it.

Continue reading “Now we know why it’s called a stuffing box.”