What? No rebedding all weekend? A nice change of pace.

Our goal this past weekend was to install the last cleat and the bow and stern pulpits.  Since this would officially mark the end of this off-season’s rebedding project, we were excited to get to it.

We thought that the bow pulpit would be a challenge because it “sprang” out when we removed it, but fortunately the whole project went fairly smoothly.  Rebedding the stern pulpit and the cleat meant that I had to climb back into “The Pit of Despair” (yes, it’s a Princess Bride reference), aka the rear lazarette, but it was a price I was glad to pay to finally finish rebedding for the season.  A few quick hours later, we were done.  Hooray!

With the rebedding finished for this year, we were able to enthusiastically turn our attention to new projects.  Tracing and removing abandoned wiring sounded good, so Jeff got started removing most of the wiring for the shore power.

Pegu Club came with a 12v electrical panel and a 120v system so she could plug into the shore power at a dock.  Sticking to our “keep it simple” ethos, keeping the shore power wasn’t even up for debate.  We are on a mooring during the summer and when we head out cruising we’ll be anchoring 99.9% of the time.  Even if we were dock people (which we aren’t), 120V wouldn’t do us any good once we leave the United States.  We plan to use solar panels to keep up with our battery consumption, and we’ll be installing one panel before the season begins (with the rest of the panels installed before we leave).  I suppose we could have simply left the shore power alone and ignored it, but we decided if we weren’t going to use it, we might as well get rid of it.

While Jeff was working on the shore power wiring, I managed to pull out the oh-so-modern cassette player and 8-cd player.  Midway through it looked like quite the jumble:

One the electronics were out, I still needed to remove get rid of the wiring.
Once the electronics were out, I still needed to get rid of the wiring.

But it wasn’t long before it looked like this:

IMG_20151025_144305033
Much better – and the VHF still worked when I was finished!

One of the benefits of removing the cassette and CD player is that we have now increased our upper storage shelves on the port side by 1/3.  The prior owners had dedicated an entire shelving unit (out of three) to their entertainment system.  We are going to install the VHF somewhere else so we can use the unit for actual storage.

As I removed everything I thought back to our last electrical “project” on Little Bristol, and marveled once again at how even just a bit of prior experience makes such a difference.  I knew what I was looking at and how to deal with it.  Smiling when I saw that the back of the 12v panel looked exactly like the one in Little Bristol, I realized that even though I am FAR from an expert when it comes to 12v systems, little by little I’m learning.

Wrapping up a short weekend at the yard (only 7 hours over two days instead of our usual 12-14), we moved Pegu-teeny to her new spot by Pegu Club.  When we brought Pegu-Teeny back to Shenny last month, we had lifted all 100 pounds of her onto the dinghy rack.  Over the past few weeks we had noticed that people were putting their dinghies under or next to their boats.  Unbeknownst to us, the dinghies need to be off the racks by November 1st, so we moved her next to Pegu Club before we left.  Now they can get to know each other over the winter.

IMG_20151024_152427611
Our two favorite boats.

Pegu-teeny looked very large on the dinghy rack – large enough that we wondered if she might be too big for the foredeck of Pegu Club.  Seeing her next to 29.9′ Pegu, however, it was clear that it wouldn’t be a problem.

Next weekend’s project – pulling chainplates!

4 thoughts on “What? No rebedding all weekend? A nice change of pace.

  1. A womens work is never done. Oops, a Pegu Clubs work is never done. It is a good thing that you both are so experienced. You will really enjoy your outings in the good weather. Love, N

    Like

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